How To Find A Restricted Phone Number: Best Methods in 2021

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No one likes dealing with telemarketers, robo and spam callers, and prank callers. When your phone rings, you probably first look at the caller ID to decide whether or not you want to answer. In less than a second, you can identify if it’s a number stored in your contacts. If it’s not, maybe you can see that it’s a toll-free number or from your area code. But what happens if you can’t preview the number at all? 

A call from a restricted phone number can be meaningless, or it could be something more serious. Either way, you likely want to figure out who’s trying to reach you. Keep reading if you want to learn more about calls from restricted phone numbers and how you can reveal the caller’s identity.

What is a Restricted Phone Number?

A restricted phone number is essentially just what it sounds like. A restricted number is the result of someone concealing their number from the person they’re dialing. Not only does this restrict you from viewing their phone number, but it also prohibits you from calling them back.

There are a number of reasons why someone may call you from a restricted phone number. An individual may make a restricted call for privacy purposes if they prefer to be anonymous and don’t want the person they’re calling to have their number. On top of that, it’s pretty easy nowadays to find someone’s address through their phone number. In that sense, a restricted phone number is a form of security.

On the other hand, a spam caller may use a restricted phone number to avoid being reported and blacklisted. This tends to be the more common case when it comes to restricted calls. More often than not, the frequency of these calls can be a nuisance and feel like harassment. 

Look up the Number With Reverse Number Lookup

No matter the reason a restricted number is being used, knowing who’s on the other end of the call gives you better peace of mind. In fact, it’s not impossible to determine who’s calling you from a restricted number. 

In the chance that the caller left a voicemail and included a name, you can use a tool like the one Kiwi Searches provides to perform an online person search. Once you’ve revealed their identity, you can learn more about the person, the company they work for, and where they’re located. Similarly, if they shared a callback number, you can input the number into Kiwi Searches’ reverse phone number search.

If the restricted caller didn’t leave a message, there’s still hope. You may be able to determine the caller by accessing your call log from your telephone service provider. Sometimes, even when the number does not pop up on your phone, it can be listed in your call records.

Activate Call Tracing to Unblock Callers

It’s time to put an end to unwanted and restricted calls once and for all. Aside from online person searches and reverse number lookups, you can rely on a call detection app. These mobile apps, such as TrueCaller, will screen incoming calls and can block sketchy restricted calls. 

If all else fails, the most effective method to uncover a restricted caller is to activate call tracking. With call tracking, you can initiate an automatic trace that will give your phone company data on the call, including the phone number and the name registered to it. For call tracking to work, you have to take immediate action after receiving a restricted call. Every provider is different in how the process works, but all should offer this service.

Now that you’re familiar with what a restricted phone number is, the reasons why people use them, and how you can find out who the caller is, you’re better prepared to handle the situation. The next time you receive a restricted call, you’ll be ready to deal with it. Save yourself the headache by easily and quickly looking up a restricted phone number.

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